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Wed, 03 Jan 2018:

Money is just misplaced effort.

Most of my waking hours are spent working on things which are not part of my long term goals in life. There is a implied social contract that if I turn my hours into money, there's some way to use it to accomplish those goals much more efficiently than if I worked on the goals on my own in those hours.

I've been thinking about where all I misplace my efforts, but for extremely good reasons.

continue reading "Misplaced Efforts"....
--
The most pitiful among men is he who turns his dreams into silver and gold.
                -- Khalil Gibran

posted at: 01:39 | path: /observations | permalink | Tags: , ,

Thu, 07 Dec 2017:

Tech interviews are very strange. The whole process makes no sense in general, when it actually comes to being hired to do actual work. This gets worse when you're dealing with a specialization that is all about identifying trade-offs and fitting solutions to them.

But let me explain this with a car analogy.

continue reading "The Paradox of Tech Interviews"....
--
New ideas pass through three periods:
1) It can't be done.
2) It probably can be done, but it's not worth doing.
3) I knew it was a good idea all along!
                 -- Arthur C Clarke

posted at: 17:11 | path: /rants | permalink | Tags: , ,

Sat, 02 Dec 2017:

For the last decade, I feel inconsolably sad about my dad's death and its circumstances, as Dec 2nd draws nearer.

For some reason, this year was different. Perhaps, it is because my mother is here with me - it is the first time in a decade that I've talked to her on Dec 2nd. But it is not just that, there's been a shift, which I barely understood till I sat down to write this.

My sadness has changed over the years. I no longer feel that sadness the same way - it is not a soul sapping feeling of despair, but a different and new emotion, that is still sadness.

I feel sorry that my dad couldn't be here to participate in our lives. He would've loved to sit around and do literally nothing, on this other side of the planet he never saw. I'd have enjoyed sitting with him, drinking tea every few hours and arguing about the legal drama that surrounds today's political news.

For years, I imagined how my life would be better if not his death ... for a brief moment today, it dawned on me how his life would've been better, if he were still here with us.

The burden of my loss has suddenly has turned into empathy for his loss. Because I'm still here, a decade later, finding light in unexpected places.

Because for once, as a parent, I know what I'd lose if I wasn't on this planet when I'm done with my working years. I'm getting ready to spend my final years observing and rambling incessantly.

Actually, I feel old enough start already - the good old days when things were really uphill both ways to school, but we did it anyway - you kids won't understand it anyway, but we had to ask people who was calling when the phone rang and all that, except these days you all ask "hey, where are you ..." instead.

Just smile, listen and nod, because that's what I'm doing for my dad, in memoriam.

--
If you don't know where you are going, any road will get you there.
              -- Lewis Carroll. "Alice in Wonderland"

posted at: 16:04 | path: /me | permalink | Tags: , ,

Fri, 24 Nov 2017:

I have started to remember more details about problems than I do about code.

Code used to occupy a large amount of my work-time thinking roots - algorithms, data structures and architectural concepts. Over the last two years, the organization of my thoughts has shifted onto understanding parallels with the real life structure of the problems. I'm looking through my attic for my brain and finding new uses for all that I've already done, which makes a better part II.

So for a while I've been putting thought into revisiting ideas, to feed them through this new lens. Here are some of them which I'd like to work towards thinking more clearly about them over 2018. If any of you have one of these problems or would like to enlighten me about how you are solving them, I'd like to buy you a beverage of your choice.

continue reading "Problems I Want to Precipitate"....
--
If you're not part of the solution ...

posted at: 18:17 | path: /fun | permalink | Tags: , ,

Fri, 11 Aug 2017:

August is the single month every year, where I go looking for a better job.

Because everytime August comes around, I'm reminded of a very specific day of my life - Aug 11th 2003.

Very clearly a bad day to recall, but first impressions are often very deep.

continue reading "Looking for a better job - part I"....
--
I don't know who you are.
I don't know what you want.
I can tell you I don't have money.
But what I do have are a very particular set of skills,
Skills I have acquired over a very long career.
               -- Paraphrasing "Taken" (2008)

posted at: 11:58 | path: /me | permalink | Tags: , ,

Mon, 30 Jan 2017:

We're into the second act, people!

This is a moment of despair, but you know what the second act is. It is a moment of character, where you get to find out if you're part of the narrative or not. Some of you reading are definitely looking away, but this is really for those who are staring out at the world in despair, watching it stare back into you.

Remember what the second act is - it is the rising action. The heroes' attempts to fix the crisis leads to ever worsening situations. And they can't win, because they haven't got the skills to deal with the forces of the other side. They must not only learn how to wield the light saber in attack, but also to believe in the force that flows through.

There's a part of me which wants to unplug the news and go back to where I have a vote. I could've done a runner with a clean conscience, refusing to fund the process with my taxes. But I've got a tiny american with me, who never got to decide what his future looks like. I cannot remain idle in his defence, but I didn't sign up to die trying.

So, I must think of the second act and what it demands.

Bassiano: And I beseech you,
          Wrest once the law to your authority:
          To do a great right, do a little wrong,
          And curb this cruel devil of his will.

Portia: It must not be; there is no power in Venice
        Can alter a decree established:
        'Twill be recorded for a precedent,
        And many an error by the same example
        Will rush into the state: it cannot be.

In this fight for essential liberties, the rule of law is overturned, we are lost. I hear the words of the lovely Portia from the Merchant of Venice. Thus we must look to the lawyers, to ride in like the cavalry. In Shakespeare's words of "The Butcher" in Henry V, lawyers for sure remember the laws and not easily forget that all animals are created equal.

JACK CADE: I thank you, good people:- there shall be no money; 
           all shall eat and drink on my score; 
           and I will apparel them all in one livery, 
           that they may agree like brothers, and worship me their lord.

DICK:      The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers.

The soap box and ballot box have not helped, let's just hope the next box has got enough stopping power. I'd hate to get to the last box, because down that way madness lies. To learn politics and law, so that my children may learn literature and art is no sacrifice, but the last box leaves us without civilization.

I don't know how this will all end. I'm not anxious anymore though, because there's one thing I worried about - that world would turn away in apathy. Because in the end what we will remember most often will not be the words of your enemies, but the silence of your friends. Do not imagine all is lost, do not mistake being out of power with being in the minority - there are more of us, when the numbers are in. This plot arc is long and we're just into the second act.

And though wise men at their end know dark is right, do not go gently into the good night!

--
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

posted at: 03:00 | path: /observations | permalink | Tags: ,

Thu, 19 Jan 2017:

I'm off facebook, after 9 years of ignoring friend requests.

This was not some voluntary choice to spend less time on useless things.

Facebook in its infinite wisdom, locked me out and demanded my driver's license (or green card, that will also do) to unlock it.

I really wish they'd just delete everything instead of holding it in some deep archive limbo.

--
Nobody exists on purpose, nobody belongs anywhere, everybody's gonna die. Come watch TV.

posted at: 01:33 | path: /misc | permalink |

Fri, 02 Dec 2016:

This is perhaps the darkest week of the year - every year since 2006.

A decade later, once again, I feel like nothing about me will be the same again.

This new sense of purpose I feel is a few months old, sleeping a few feet away.

The baton is passed, not quite yet and I haven't let go.

--
"Life is effort, and I’ll stop when I die."
      -- Rick & Morty

posted at: 00:34 | path: /me | permalink | Tags: , ,

Thu, 08 Sep 2016:

Today's the first day of year 5 for me in Hortonworks.

I've now spent more than a decade getting paid to do open source work. But until Hortonworks, all work I did was tangential to the business arm of the company. All my customers were internal, which meant mostly I got privileged access to the problems. The bug resolution for complex issues never had to deal with walls of customer solutions obscuring my insights into the system. There was never a day when I couldn't tell someone from Yahoo mail that I was working on another issue with Frontpage.

During my Zynga period, I learnt how to sell your ideas to a product focus team looking for solutions - to explain better, to justify my arguments with numbers, to convince and to persuade. To keep my sanity, I also learnt to pick my battles, drop issues and walk away when the friction gets personal.

I never had to sell to a customer direct - even at my best, on the books of the company I was a cost, an engineering expense. My work at Zynga or Yahoo, was helping the company bring down its bottom line by a fraction without ever touching the top line, except by accident (yay, faster load times).

This is generally an area of work with no real conflicts of interest built into it - use of APC for instance was mandated and in most cases, my code was the only available solution to the problem. Giving up on APC meant switching to HipHop, which also I worked on (never got the CLA signed by Zynga, which was sad though). The pattern followed me through out the period even through ZCloud build-out, through ZPerfmon, ZProf and pretty much everything I touched.

Hortonworks has been a completely different experience. I'm still a developer, but my contribution to the company has turned into a top-line enlarging investment in most scenarios. The work I was doing with Stinger was actively bringing in more customers and indirectly, more revenue in. This brings in some interesting conflicts for a developer, when talking to a customer about your features, because that particular transaction starts off as a zero sum exchange of money with the implicit declaration that the "solution" is a non-zero sum win-win.

This shift in the nature of my job has been interesting. The role now requires a completely different social skill set which I didn't need in any job before this. The goal is nearly the same, but conflicts fall onto my lap instead of being able to just say "Zynga first" to end a discussion.

Honestly, it's been a bit of a culture shock.

continue reading "Hortonworks: Day 1, Year 5"....
--
Boredom is the feeling that everything is a waste of time; serenity, that nothing is.
          -- Thomas Szasz

posted at: 22:40 | path: /me | permalink | Tags: ,

Wed, 20 Apr 2016:

My grandfather passed away last week.

When I was at one of life's cross-roads, he rescued me with some advice I hold onto as one of my life's truths.

Sacrifice. It's a word that gets thrown around in the social context without any inherent meaning. Just like other things caused by peer pressure, the sacrificial act is a social demonstration of emotion, at the detriment of nearly everyone intimately involved in it. Mothers give up their careers to stay at home. fathers end up working longer and so on.

After my dad's untimely end, there was a choice left to me - envelope pushed under the door of my mourning, if you will. Move back to Trivandrum and try to support my mother & sister while they mourn the inconsolable loss. Social signals told me clearly that it's what's expected from a "good son".

I thought otherwise. I was wracked with guilt at the thought of staying in Bangalore, chasing my own life's goals which had been on hold for the couple of years my father was ill. And I couldn't bring myself to ignore the social pressures and was caving in to them, when I talked to my muthachan.

He got to right to the point.

"Is this something your mother asked you to do?" / "No". "Do you think leaving Yahoo and moving to Trivandrum is good for you?" / "No". "Is moving back home likely to be a disappointing thing for you?" / "Yes".

"Then don't do it. We're here to take care of your mother. She is my child." / "Ok, but ..."

"Your mother will need you in a few years, your sister will need you. Be there. But you will do this one crazy gesture they never asked for, because people pressure you into making it. When times are bad and your life isn't moving forward, you won't think of those pressures. You will blame the ones you really did it all for."

"And one day, you will get angry about something and tell your mother that you did it all for her. That your life's frustrations are due to her. Maybe it won't be your mother and it will be your sister - she will tell you that she didn't ask for it, that you did it all on your own. That your sacrifice wasn't necessary and then you'll feel hollow, because it was all for nothing, how you turned away from your self, silenced your wants and died a little for them. You will be truly angry with them for your thoughtless sacrifice and never let it go."

"If what I said sounds inevitable. Don't do it. Go do your thing now and whenever your mother or your sister need help they will not hesitate to ask. Be there for them without question. When it's the right decision to take, you won't feel yourself tearing apart."

That is how I got to today, half a world away mourning his death, knowing fully well I couldn't go & be by my mother's side.

And this time, I wasn't tearing myself apart.

--
Much of what was said did not matter, and that much of what mattered could not be said.

posted at: 02:51 | path: /me | permalink | Tags: , ,

Sat, 06 Feb 2016:

We'll see what happens. Yes, but ... OK, I will try.

There are so many ways to say No. Some of you might've realized that's what gets said. But I've seen very few who understand why it gets said in circuitous soft words, other than attributing it to race or upbringing.

Because of what happens when you say No. There's always someone else who's waiting to say Yes. Time after time, each No you say shrinks the number of times you get asked and life's opportunities show up as questions. The fewer times you're approached with a question, the fewer times will you get to say Yes!. Each No shrinks the funnel through which other people interact with you.

Being reasonable produces the opposite result you want. Those that say "Yes, let's do this!" and flake out are often asked more often than those who can offer a negative in time. In fact that those who say "No, I'm meeting a friend tomorrow" only to have their friend flake out is worse off than someone with double bookings.

Whether the opportunities are social, personal or professional, those that a "Yes, we can try" are preferred to the respectful No. Of course, we prefer the "Can Do" people here.

The definite negative implies intention, while the loosely held hope is always treated better. The negative is interpreted as sub-textual while the other is taken as a circumstantial "stuff happens" even when the eventual end result is the same - probably worse for the "maybe" because it steals away the ability to plan an alternative.

In such an environment where all Yes-es are Maybe, being "Definitely Maybe" is understood well - and saying "No" becomes a "No-No".

In short, when it comes to saying No - I'll try.

--
The right word may be effective, but no word was ever as effective as a rightly timed pause.
            -- Mark Twain

posted at: 23:35 | path: /rants | permalink | Tags: ,

Tue, 25 Aug 2015:

Must be a strange coincidence, but I think nearly all of my farewell letters have been written in August.

As the days get a tiny bit shorter, all the energy that the summer brings turns into a certain impatience. Sitting in front of a desk, when the brightness outside is getting wasted.

Perhaps you don't feel it, but there's a general ebb of life that makes me acutely conscious of my mortality. A certain knowledge that summer is passing and I'm still indoors, to wait for another year perhaps to enjoy the summer sunshine.

And yet, it's not that I feel sad about the passing of days - those days aren't here. It's a call to freedom. A primal urge to make most of the days in the sun, without concern, because the winter that will follow is inevitable. To plant all the energy of the summer that's half-gone and reap the rest.

Need to just head out into the sunshine & high mountains, leaving work in the valleys.

--
Your career is like a box of chocolates - you never know what you're going to get.

posted at: 16:27 | path: /me | permalink | Tags: , ,

Mon, 06 Jul 2015:

Here's a short quick set of questions.

Do you work heavily whenever a project causes disappointment, when you are under pressure or have had a quarrel with someone?

Have you built up a tolerance to your life style and developed strategies to cope with lack of sleep when driving?

Have you gone back to work in the morning only to not understand what you were thinking when you wrote some code last night?

When you work in a team, do you find yourself taking up an unfair share of work automatically?

Do you ever feel uncomfortable when you are too far away from work stress, particularly if you've turned off work email?

Are you in a hurry to get some part of your work done, before you have to meet the rest of the team for a standup?

Do you find yourself picking up some work to do, after you make sure your wife and kids are already asleep?

Has a family member or friend complained about you preferring to work instead of going to a social occasion?

Do you ever promise to meet for an event (kid's recital, date night) and missed it because you were caught up in work?

Have you noticed that despite spending more time at work, you get less and less done these days?

Do you eat very little or irregularly, during periods of overworking?

Do you ever feel depressed or anxious during or after periods of heavy working?

Have you tried to change your work habits for several attempts without achieving any real change?

Do you ever find yourself making excuses that this is entirely temporary, while consistently overworking for months?

Do you try to cram in as many lifestyle activites as possible into a single weekend, to make the break from work count?

Do you ever find yourself wondering how other people find time for their hobbies?

Do you motivate yourself with thoughts that when one day you're rich from all this work, you will be able to retire and pursue hobbies?

--
If this myth is tragic, that is because its hero is conscious.
Where would his torture be, indeed, if at every step the hope of succeeding upheld him?
The workman of today works everyday in his life at the same tasks, and his fate is no less absurd.
But it is tragic only at the rare moments when it becomes conscious.
        -- Albert Camus, "The Myth of Sisyphus"

posted at: 21:48 | path: /observations | permalink | Tags: , ,

Sun, 21 Dec 2014:

Nobody commits suicide.

At least, nobody commits suicide any more than they commit a diabetic coma or a cardiac arrest.

It isn't a crime to commit, it is the unfortunate demise brought on by years of accumulated damage - perhaps a less acceptable one than a surfeit of cheeseburgers.

If you're the one playing the devil's advocate for sinners, please rank it with gluttony and sloth.

continue reading "A Rush to Final Judgement"....
--
It is often said that before you die your life passes before your eyes. It is in fact true. It's called living.
      -- Terry Pratchett

posted at: 15:51 | path: /me | permalink | Tags: , ,

Tue, 18 Nov 2014:

It has been 7 years since my last conversation with him. Maybe it's only been six since I missed him.

Maybe I didn't say anything to anyone when he died, but with all the lack of orginality I posess, let me repeat something. If only as l'esprit de l'escalier, 8 years later if you will.

MY FATHER WAS AN EXCEPTIONAL MAN!
He had his... shortcomings, but he took care of his family. 
He loved his family. He loved this house. He worked hard. 

All I wanted today was to show him how much we all loved and admired him.

To give him the respect that he deserved... Is that really so much to ask?

We all get so distracted by the... little things in life.

We forget about the important things. Like the fact that we lost a great man.

We don't know why a man makes the choices he makes.

But I do know that my father made the best choices he could make. 

Life is complicated. 

We're just thrown here together in a world filled with chaos and confusion... and we do our best.

He taught us to go for what we wanted in life, because you never know how long you're going to be here.


So when you all leave here today, I want you to remember him for who he really was. 

A decent, loving man who never condemned anyone for how they lived. Who never cast disparaging remarks 
or held prejudices against race, gender... height. If only we could all be as giving, as generous, 
as understanding as my father. 

If I am half the man my father was, my child will be incredibly blessed.
             
            -- (paraphrased from) Death at a Funeral, 2007 

My father was an exceptional man. He was exceptional in every way, in his strength and his weakness.

I am my mother in weakeness and my father in strength. He's the part of me who can plot paths to wins, she taught me how to fail & be undefeated.

My mother taught me how to endure, to abide, to suffer the endless slings & arrows - my father showed me how to fight, how to lose battles and win wars. To take invisible swords upto invisible monsters and slay them. If my father taught me to fight, my mother taught me to never give up. She passed onto me, her endless source of hope. She taught, if not by words but example, that everything passes, including waves of troubles & sadness. Just hold your breath and dive, she showed - find the bottom and push back all the way up.

I learnt strategy from him - I very rarely played chess with him and he would reluctantly destroy me in calculated moves. I rarely put myself in front of that juggernaut because of what came after I lost, a clear description of why I lost, step by step of when I had an advantage & how I squandered it. I learnt patience from watching him - that patience isn't waiting, patience is observing, watching for the right moment - with a finger on the trigger, eye on the scope.

I learnt to listen and remember. Of all of my life's conversations (yet), he's the person I've talked the most to. I missed the conversations with him about fundamental human nature, sitting on a Bajaj Chetak, with him explaining to me in great detail the importance of understanding. Nothing more, just understanding everything. Perhaps, I learnt to be pedantic too - to understand what's different about wealth, value, cost, price. Understand that money is important, but never a goal. Understand that you should always engineer all-winner scenarios and never work with people who will still want you to lose. Understand altruisim & co-operation is just another word for long-term selfishness. Understand that help you give that is nothing to you, but everything to someone else is the best form of it. Understand that gender is meaningful, but not discriminatory (between me & my sister). That laws we have to obey are never entirely fair - that both the rich & poor are prohibited from sleeping on park benches in the night.

He didn't just talk about it, I saw his principles moving him - some of those came up because he was the Director of Social Welfare in Kerala government.

Not all his lessons were imparted kindly. I watched over my father for a year. I felt like the parent - making sure he ate food on time, took his medication, to make sure he slept, to run to his bed-side when he had nightmares. To stay up next to him when he slept in his hospital bed, reading, while the sedatives kicked in and kept him from tossing about in his bed. I had to deal with him when he threw tantrums and I know it hurt him more when I couldn't understand him or calm him down. I was filled with a homesickness that only comes to those who are already home and I wanted him to go back to being the same awesome father I always had. Deep inside his heart, he knew he could never be that person again. And he tried to tell me, but I didn't believe that - to believe him seemed like letting go of all hope. Never wanted to pass through the door inscribed "Abandon all hope, ye who enter here".

Years after, in mid-November I get angry about all that again, I remember that he was the most considerate of human beings even to the end - I found his paperwork sorted and filed in the order of use after his death.

I wonder about all our conversations - was he was leaving a part of him to live, even after he takes the rest to an early grave?

And just for that, I will always love him.

--
All that we love deeply becomes a part of us.
      -- Helen Keller

posted at: 11:47 | path: /me | permalink | Tags: ,

Sun, 20 Oct 2013:

This is very definitely not about computer monitors. It is a story about data hashing, distribution and indeed re-distribution - about divisors, primes and more than all of that, downtime & costs.

In all honesty, I'm just posting a conversation from a coffee break almost two years ago (and some context to frame it). I'm writing this down now because it has reached the edge of my memory and is about to fall off.

One day, Prakash in the middle of coffee started to talk about the pains that powers of two cause. I assume, it was because one of the membase clusters (now called zBase) was running out of capacity and needed to be doubled in size.

Doubling in size was the only way our clusters grew, which was all well & good when the product was on its way up. It means you can double in size rather rapidly and without any real downtime. But it does cost a lot of money to keep doing after the first or second rehashing. Doubling made even more sense in a master-slave setup because the old cluster became the new masters and dropped half the data each, which would then be caught up by a new array of slaves which meant it would happen without any downtime for data copying and was a nearly no-risk operation.

This is relatively straight-forward, because the masters only have key invalidations happening during the re-shard. No data actually moves between masters during the reshard. This is brilliant because a few seconds after you flip the switch, the master array is ready to update and the slaves have a few minutes to catch up. But this is very expensive. Say, you had a 4 node cluster serving out data and eventually node1 runs out of space, then you need to add 4 more extra servers where otherwise only 2 would have been sufficient.

But this is primarily a one-way street. You cannot shrink a server cluster to half its size by this method.

continue reading "1440 > 1024"....
--
There is no safety in numbers, or in anything else.
  -- James Thurber

posted at: 23:20 | path: /hacks | permalink | Tags: , ,